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8 Tips To Remember What You Read

7) Oper­ate With­in Your Atten­tion Span

Pay­ing atten­tion is cen­tral to mem­o­riza­tion. Try­ing to read when you can’t con­cen­trate is wast­ing time. Since most peo­ple have short atten­tion spans, they should not try to read dense mate­r­i­al for more than 10 or 15 min­utes at a time. After such a ses­sion, they should take a break and quiz them­selves on what they just read.

Ulti­mate­ly, read­ers should dis­ci­pline their atten­tion so they can con­cen­trate for longer peri­ods.

8) Rehearse Soon After Read­ing Is Fin­ished

At the read­ing ses­sion end, rehearse what you learned right away. Avoid dis­trac­tions and mul­ti-task­ing because they inter­fere with the con­sol­i­da­tion process­es that enable longer-term mem­o­ry. Answer again the ques­tions about con­tent men­tioned in the “Rehearse As You Go Along” sec­tion.

Think about and rehearse what you read at least twice lat­er that day. Rehearse again at last once for the next 2–3 days.

In Sum­ma­ry

  1. Read with a pur­pose.
  2. Skim first.
  3. Get the read­ing mechan­ics right.
  4. Be judi­cious in high­light­ing and note tak­ing.
  5. Think in pic­tures.
  6. Rehearse as you go along.
  7. Stay with­in your atten­tion span and work to increase that span.
  8. Rehearse again soon.

Ref­er­ence

Noice, H., and Noice, T. 2000. Two approach­es to learn­ing a the­atri­cal script, p. 444–455. In Mem­o­ry Observed, edit­ed by Ulric Neiss­er and Ira Hyman, Jr. Worth Pub­lish­ers, New York, N.Y.

Bill KlemmW. R. (Bill) Klemm, D.V.M., Ph.D. Sci­en­tist, pro­fes­sor, author, speak­er. As a pro­fes­sor of Neu­ro­science at Texas A&M Uni­ver­si­ty, Bill has taught about the brain and behav­ior at all lev­els, from fresh­men, to seniors, to grad­u­ate stu­dents to post-docs. His recent books include Thank You, Brain, For All You Remem­ber. What You For­got Was My Fault‚ and Core Ideas in Neu­ro­science.

More arti­cles on how to improve mem­o­ry skills:

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7 Responses

  1. deepikaur says:

    Excel­lent arti­cle! I just read that entire post, out loud, and retained the main points from it. These tips will cer­tain­ly come in handy. Thank you.

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    For younger young­sters, tak­ing part in video games is best than watch­ing TV , based on Qeens­land Uni­ver­si­ty of Exper­tise Games Research and
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  6. Jacob says:

    This arti­cle has real­ly helped me with the abil­i­ty to com­pre­hend what I am read­ing, thank you.

  7. Liz says:

    The first step in learn­ing how to read and retain infor­ma­tion from schol­ar­ly works is to under­stand how they are orga­nized. Each field has spe­cif­ic con­ven­tions regard­ing the com­po­si­tion of peer reviewed arti­cles and books. Most sci­en­tif­ic arti­cles include an intro­duc­tion which sets the stage for the research study, a meth­ods sec­tion which describes how the research was con­duct­ed, includ­ing sam­ples and mea­sures, a results sec­tion dis­cussing the sta­tis­ti­cal analy­ses con­duct­ed and whether the hypoth­e­sis was sup­port­ed or refut­ed, and a dis­cus­sion sec­tion that con­sid­ers the study s find­ings in light of the research lit­er­a­ture and draws over­all con­clu­sions. Books con­tain struc­tured argu­ment, gen­er­al­ly lead­ing from an intro­duc­tion to chap­ters that make and sup­port spe­cif­ic points, and con­clud­ing with a dis­cus­sion that draws con­clu­sions. Learn the con­ven­tions of your dis­ci­pline.

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