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Hours of TV viewing are associated with worse cognitive function”

oscar_ybarra

Prof. Oscar Ybar­ra

Ques­tion by Bob Lath­an:
“In your clin­i­cal tri­al described in The Sharp­Brains Guide, both the social group and the intel­lec­tu­al activ­i­ties group got cog­ni­tive boosts, as opposed to the Sein­feld watch­ing group. While I am sure there is much more research to be done…isn’t it pret­ty clear that most peo­ple would ben­e­fit from watch­ing less TV and spend­ing more time doing com­plex social or intel­lec­tu­al stuff? What do you think about stats show­ing that the aver­age Amer­i­can spends 3 or 4 hours watch­ing TV per day?”

Answer by Prof. Oscar Ybar­ra:
“Dear Bob, I am in full agree­ment. In addi­tion to the exper­i­men­tal work we did, I have con­duct­ed large scale sur­veys with thou­sands of peo­ple and find that hours of TV view­ing are asso­ci­at­ed with worse cog­ni­tive func­tion. I believe oth­er researchers have obtained sim­i­lar results. Although TV view­ing (con­tent) varies much across indi­vid­u­als, it seems to con­sis­tent­ly pre­dict low­er cog­ni­tive func­tion. Assum­ing this rela­tion­ship is gen­er­al­ly causal (as our exper­i­men­tal work sug­gests), I do think there are more pro­duc­tive things peo­ple could be doing with the hours they devote to watch­ing TV on a dai­ly basis.”

> Keep read­ing Q&A tran­script with Prof. Oscar Ybar­ra on Social Inter­ac­tions and the Brain

> The Sharp­Brains Guide to Brain Fit­ness

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Categories: Cognitive Neuroscience, Education & Lifelong Learning, Health & Wellness

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As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, CNN, Reuters,  SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking how brain science can improve our health and our lives.

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