Sunday Afternoon Quiz

Here’s a quick quiz to test your mem­o­ry and think­ing skills which should work out your tem­po­ral and frontal lobes. See how you do!

  1. Name the one sport in which nei­ther the spec­ta­tors nor the par­tic­i­pants know the score or the leader until the con­test ends.
  2. What famous North Amer­i­can land­mark is con­stant­ly mov­ing backward?
  3. Of all veg­eta­bles, only two can live to pro­duce on their own for sev­er­al grow­ing sea­sons. All oth­er veg­eta­bles must be replant­ed every year. What are the only two peren­ni­al vegetables?
  4. What fruit has its seeds on the outside?
  5. In many liquor stores, you can buy pear brandy, with a real pear inside the bot­tle. The pear is whole and ripe, and the bot­tle is gen­uine; it has­n’t been cut in any way. How did the pear get inside the bottle?
  6. Only three words in Stan­dard Eng­lish begin with the let­ters “dw” and they are all com­mon words. Name two of them.
  7. There are 14 punc­tu­a­tion marks in Eng­lish gram­mar. Can you name at least half of them?
  8. Name the one veg­etable or fruit that is nev­er sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any oth­er form except fresh.
  9. Name 6 or more things that you can wear on your feet begin­ning with the let­ter “S.”

 —

Answers To Quiz:

  1.  The one sport in which nei­ther the spec­ta­tors, nor the par­tic­i­pants, know the score or the leader until the con­test ends: boxing
  2.  The North Amer­i­can land­mark con­stant­ly mov­ing back­ward: Nia­gara Falls (the rim is worn down about two and a half feet each year because of the mil­lions of gal­lons of water that rush over it every minute.)
  3. Only two veg­eta­bles that can live to pro­duce on their own for sev­er­al grow­ing sea­sons: aspara­gus and rhubarb.
  4. The fruit with its seeds on the out­side: strawberry.
  5. How did the pear get inside the brandy bot­tle? It grew inside the bot­tle. (The bot­tles are placed over pear buds when they are small and are wired in place on the tree. The bot­tle is left in place for the entire grow­ing sea­son. When the pears are ripe, they are snipped off at the stems.)
  6. Three Eng­lish words begin­ning with “dw”: dwarf, dwell, and dwindle.
  7. Four­teen punc­tu­a­tion marks in Eng­lish gram­mar: peri­od, com­ma, colon, semi­colon, dash, hyphen, apos­tro­phe, ques­tion mark, excla­ma­tion point, quo­ta­tion marks, brack­ets, paren­the­sis, braces, and ellipses.
  8. The only veg­etable or fruit nev­er sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any oth­er form but fresh: lettuce.
  9. Six or more things you can wear on your feet begin­ning with “s”: shoes, socks, san­dals, sneak­ers, slip­pers, skis, skates, snow­shoes, stock­ings, stilts.

 

More brain teas­er games:

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49 Comments

  1. Natovr on June 11, 2008 at 10:31

    Real­ly intrest­ing :) some stuff I did­n’t know about…
    Num­ber 1 I thought was ath­let­ics, or chess (yeah, chess is a sport :D)
    Num­ber 3, I thought it was pota­toes and toma­toes (but these can’t grow over seasons)
    Num­ber 4 and 5 I got instant­ly.. its how they grow square water­mel­ons too :p
    Num­ber 6 I only got dwindle
    Num­ber 7, i almost for­got ques­tion mark but i got it :D
    Num­ber 8… had a prob­lem… I thought pineap­ple, because they can’t real­ly be frozen or canned… that’s what i THOUGHT o.o
    Num­ber 9 i thought stock­ings and socks were the same thing

    Stum­bled :D



  2. superpablo on June 14, 2008 at 9:00

    I agree with Alvaro. The quiz was a good brain teas­er and chal­leng­ing it is anoth­er. Keep think­ing, people!



  3. angelee on June 14, 2008 at 8:38

    for the last ques­tion, stil­letos could be an answer! btw



  4. Cai on June 15, 2008 at 6:28

    Cab­bage ( a form of let­tuce) comes in all kinds of bags and cans. 

    Sauer­kraut.



  5. NoDownloadsKThxBai on June 15, 2008 at 6:31

    Because hav­ing to down­load an RTF to get the answers is just plain stu­pid, here they are:

    Answers To Quiz: 

    1. The one sport in which nei­ther the spec­ta­tors, nor the par­tic­i­pants, know the score or the leader until the con­test ends: boxing 

    2. The North Amer­i­can land­mark con­stant­ly mov­ing back­ward: Nia­gara Falls (the rim is worn down about two and a half feet each year because of the mil­lions of gal­lons of water that rush over it every minute.) 

    3. Only two veg­eta­bles that can live to pro­duce on their own for sev­er­al grow­ing sea­sons: aspara­gus and rhubarb. 

    4. The fruit with its seeds on the out­side: strawberry. 

    5. How did the pear get inside the brandy bot­tle? It grew inside the bot­tle. (The bot­tles are placed over pear buds when they are small and are wired in place on the tree. The bot­tle is left in place for the entire grow­ing sea­son. When the pears are ripe, they are snipped off at the stems.) 

    6. Three Eng­lish words begin­ning with “dw”: dwarf, dwell, and dwindle. 

    7. Four­teen punc­tu­a­tion marks in Eng­lish gram­mar: peri­od, com­ma, colon, semi­colon, dash, hyphen, apos­tro­phe, ques­tion mark, excla­ma­tion point, quo­ta­tion marks, brack­ets, paren­the­sis, braces, and ellipses. 

    8. The only veg­etable or fruit nev­er sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any oth­er form but fresh: lettuce. 

    9. Six or more things you can wear on your feet begin­ning with “s”: shoes, socks, san­dals, sneak­ers, slip­pers, skis, skates, snow­shoes, stock­ings, stilts.



  6. Alvaro on June 16, 2008 at 8:43

    I have to dis­agree that some­thing we did is “plain stu­pid” (we do things for a rea­son) but I agree that at this point it is a pain more than a good option, so will main­tain the answers here. 

    Thanks for being proac­tive and solve a problem.



  7. chris on July 1, 2008 at 6:52

    Dwarf!



  8. hh on July 12, 2008 at 6:58

    Natovr, …you’ve nev­er had or seen canned pineapple?



  9. Gurubaliga on July 16, 2008 at 6:15

    4) The Cashew which is a seed grow out­side its fruit.



  10. nick on September 1, 2008 at 1:32

    4) Straw­ber­ries



  11. mark on September 11, 2008 at 8:22

    Answer to ques­tion on Feet and “S” — Sun Tan lotion (I have been burned before)



  12. Ashy on October 17, 2008 at 2:21

    8. You know, not to play dev­il’s advo­cate here, but aren’t all vegtables/fruits some­how served as baby food?

    7. is the slash, / not con­sid­ered a valid punc­tu­a­tion mark?

    1. in box­ing, the guy who’s bleed­ing the most is like­ly los­ing. If you’re well versed in box­ing, it’s not too hard to deter­mine a leader by spec­tat­ing. I think fish­ing or sumo are much bet­ter answers.



  13. Expat on November 17, 2008 at 11:29

    The Asian fruit is called a duri­an, not “dar­i­an”. It stinks like a rot­ten peach­es over an open sew­er. It is eat­en raw or is used to make smooth­ies, ice cream, and cakes. Let­tuce fig­ures heav­i­ly in Asian cui­sine, both in soups and fried.

    I don’t think there is a sin­gle veg­etable which is not pre­pared some­how, some­where (cut­ting or shred­ding does not count).



  14. Mike on November 17, 2008 at 12:38

    Ashy — not let­tuce, dope.

    9. Stir­rups



  15. ubergoober on December 21, 2008 at 6:11

    ASHY — let me know when you find your first jar of let­tuce baby food for sale. And some of the rest of you don’t read well. The Ques­tion said “name one” veg­etable not “there is only one” Some­times when you focus to tight­ly on being right you force your­self to be wrong. Part of being a pro­gres­sive thinker is not so much to find fault but to offer alter­na­tive views. These are two dif­fer­ent things.



  16. Al on January 8, 2009 at 10:02

    Isn’t let­tuce trans­port­ed frozen?



  17. Yvette on January 18, 2009 at 3:38

    umm straw­ber­ries have its seeds on the outside!

    and i think bananas r always sold fresh.



  18. Larry on February 4, 2009 at 7:18

    And let’s not for­get about #9 Spurs…for all those cow­boys out there.



  19. Lisa on February 11, 2009 at 9:19

    Dwarf Dwell Dwindle!



  20. Rick on February 24, 2009 at 9:00

    What about gym­nas­tics for #1?



  21. Miss Blu on March 15, 2009 at 2:36

    Hey Lar­ry… As a cow­girl who wears spurs I’d have to say there are lots of cowboy/girl sports that qual­i­fy you may know the time but you don’t know where you’ll fall until the end… Bar­rel Rac­ing, Pole Bend­ing, Team Rop­ing, Break-a-way rop­ing, calf rop­ing, etc.



  22. b mor on April 23, 2009 at 4:28

    1. If we are going to include chess, then what about pok­er (it’s on ESPN) and ball­room danc­ing (near­ly in the Olympics).

    Gym­nas­tics: as one sees the scores on an ongo­ing basis, one knows the leader.

    7. How could one for­get “?” when there are 5 in the questions–including ques­tion 7. Includ­ing the intro­duc­tion, there are 7 punc­tu­a­tion marks.

    8. The ques­tion says “sold frozen”, so being trans­port­ed frozen, does­n’t make it a looser.

    9. Would­n’t “ski boots” be a bet­ter answer than skis?



  23. Kyle on May 5, 2009 at 3:00

    - Name the one sport in which nei­ther the spec­ta­tors nor the par­tic­i­pants know the score or the leader until the con­test ends. ‑Skate is anoth­er sport that nobody knows their score until it ends. =)



  24. Myranda on October 27, 2009 at 3:11

    4.don’t straw­ber­ries have their seeds on the outside?



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SHARPBRAINS is an independent think-tank and consulting firm providing services at the frontier of applied neuroscience, health, leadership and innovation.

English About SharpBrains

SHARPBRAINS es un think-tank y consultoría independiente proporcionando servicios para la neurociencia aplicada, salud, liderazgo e innovación.

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