Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Icon

Jogging our Brains for Brain Vitality, Healthy Aging-and Intelligence!

Stroop Test

Quick: say the color in which each word in this graphic is displayed (don’t just read the word!):

Here you have a round-up of some great recent articles on memory, aging, and cognitive abilities such as self-control:

1) How to Boost Your Willpower (New York Times).

– “The video watchers were later given a concentration test in which they were asked to identify the color in which words were displayed. (Note: now you see why we started with that brain exercise…) The word  for instance, might appear in blue ink. The video watchers who had stifled their responses did the worst on the test, suggesting that their self-control had already been depleted by the film challenge.”

– “Finally, some research suggests that people struggling with self-control should start small. A few studies show that people who were instructed for two weeks to make small changes like improving their posture or brushing their teeth with their opposite hand improved their scores on laboratory tests of self-control. The data aren’t conclusive, but they do suggest that the quest for self-improvement should start small. A vow to stop swearing, to make the bed every day or to give up just one food may be a way to strengthen your self-control, giving you more willpower reserves for bigger challenges later.”

Comment: learning, building abilities, are processes that require practice and growing levels of difficulty. Like training our muscles in the gym. So the advice to start small and progressively do more makes sense. Many times the enemy of learning is the stress and anxiety we provoke by trying to do too many things at the same time…

2) Jogging Your Memory (Newsweek) Thanks Chris for alerting us!

– “No one should expect miracles soon, if at all. But the deeper scientists peer into the workings of memory, the better they understand Read the rest of this entry »

Brain Teasers and Games for the Brain: Test your Brain

Frontal LobesIt is always good to stimulate our minds and to learn a bit about how our brains work. Here you have a selection of the 50 Brain Teasers that people have enjoyed the most in our blog and speaking engagements.

Fun experiments on how our brains work

1. Do you think you know the colors?: try the Stroop Test.

2. Can you count?: Basketball attention experiment (Interactive).

3. Who is this?: A very important little guy (Interactive).

4. How is this possible?.

5. Take the Senses Challenge (Interactive).

6. Are there more brain connections or leaves in the Amazon?.

AttentionTwo In One Task

7. How are your divided attention skills? check out “Inside and Outside” (Interactive, from MindFit).

8. Can you walk and chew gum at the same time? try “Two in One” (Interactive, from MindFit)

9. Count the Fs in this sentence.

10. What do you see? can you alternate between 2 views?.

MemoryPicasso Task

11. Easy one…draw the face of a penny, please. Read the rest of this entry »

Top 10 Brain Teasers and Games, with a neuroscience angle

No matter what we are reading or doing, there is always the need to take a little break and challenge our minds (and to learn a bit about how our brains work). Here you have a selection of the 10 Brain Teasers that people have enjoyed most in this site.

1. Do you think you know the colors?: the Stroop Test

2. Can you count?: Basketball attention experiment

3. Planning is not that easy: Towers of Hanoi

4. Interactive visual illusion: the Muller-Lyer Illusion

5. Who is this?: A very important little guy

5. How many…: Train your Frontal and Parietal lobes

6. What’s the missing number: Pattern Recognition Brain Teaser

7. Who’s the eldest?: Reasoning Skills Brain Teaser

8. Brain Puzzle for the Whole Brain: The Blind Beggar

9. Is a circle a circle?: Visual Perception Brain Teaser

10. How is this possible?
Read the rest of this entry »

#1. The Stroop Test: Great brain teaser to challenge your mental vitality and flexibility

stroop-testReady to test your mental vitality and flexibility?

Quick — say aloud what color you see in every word, NOT the word you read.

Go from left to right, from top to down. Ready. Set. Go!

—-

Not easy, right? This task is called the Stroop Test, and is used in neuropsychological evaluations to measure mental vitality and flexibility, since performing well requires strong attention, inhibition and self-regulation capability (also called executive functions).

Next brain teaser in SharpBrains’ top 25 series:

Brain exercise: Better than coffee

Young-old Quick! say aloud what color you see in every word, NOT the word you read.
The Stroop test is used in neuropsychological evaluations to measure mental vitality and flexibility, since performing well requires strong inhibition capability.

Enjoy the day.

For more, click on Top 10 Brain Teasers and Games, with a neuroscience angle

About SharpBrains

As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, CNN, Reuters, and more, SharpBrains is an independent market research firm and think tank tracking health and performance applications of brain science.

Learn More & Reserve Your Spot At Discounted Rates

Search for anything brain-related in our article archives

Enter Your Email to receive Sharp­Brains free, monthly eNewslet­ter:

Join more than 50,000 Sub­scribers and stay informed and engaged.