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Quick brain game to test the limits of your peripheral vision

Try this quick game to test your peripheral vision, visual short-term memory and hand-eye coordination.

Instructions: When all the numbered red squares are visible, try to get rid of them as fast as you can, in numerical order. You don’t have to click them… just touch them with the cursor.

–> To start: Click HERE

 

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10 Responses

  1. sheri says:

    there were no 2,3,4 …that’s strange.

  2. Alvaro says:

    Hello Sheri, I can see the 2,3,4…do you see them now?

  3. nancy says:

    best I could do was 33 seconds…I guess that would be 1 number per second..this would be great practice for hockey players..I was imagining they were all pucks.

  4. Alvaro says:

    that’s pretty good Nancy…and yes, hockey players (or basketball ones) need to have great peripheral vision and rection times!

  5. Lmnop says:

    47 seconds…on a laptop. 😀

  6. Black Guy says:

    i got thirty seconds dont kno if thats good or not but i play basketball prolly explains why im so good

  7. jairo obando says:

    I got thirty one after several times.It is an interesting exercise

  8. BRyan says:

    i am 14 years old an i am in college material information i just wanted to say i love this game and i don’t want it to g away and if it does i am going to give all of you the swine flu

  9. Suzanne says:

    How do “old” people typically do??? I’m 60 and on the second try I did the puzzle in 75 seconds. sloooow?

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