Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Icon

The World Economic Forum hosts Global Future Council on Neurotechnologies in Dubai (November 10–12th)

Quick heads-up on a very promis­ing event.

Descrip­tion: Quick­ly devel­op­ing neu­rotech­nolo­gies will have an impact on entire indus­tries, gov­ern­ments, and soci­eties in the future. The Glob­al Future Coun­cil on Neu­rotech­nolo­gies will explore these tech­no­log­i­cal devel­op­ments and their eth­i­cal impli­ca­tions for soci­ety. Read the rest of this entry »

The National Science Foundation (NSF) funds Neurotechnology Hubs and innovative tools to advance research on Brain & Behavior

 

– Cor­nell Uni­ver­si­ty neu­ro­sci­en­tist Chris Xu will study how brains pro­duce behav­ior in species across a range of sizes.

NSF issues awards to advance a nation­al research infra­struc­ture for neu­ro­science (press release by the Nation­al Sci­ence Foun­da­tion):

The Nation­al Sci­ence Foun­da­tion (NSF) has made 17 Next Gen­er­a­tion Net­works for Neu­ro­science (Neu­roNex) awards to aid the research com­mu­ni­ty as it pur­sues one of its grand­est chal­lenges: under­stand­ing the brain.

These projects will sup­port the devel­op­ment of inno­v­a­tive, acces­si­ble and shared capa­bil­i­ties and resources, as well as the­o­ret­i­cal frame­works and com­pu­ta­tion­al mod­el­ing to advance neu­ro­science research Read the rest of this entry »

News: Advanced Brain Monitoring receives Global Health and Pharma Award for clinical-grade platforms monitoring brain’s electrical activity

Advanced Brain Mon­i­tor­ing Named “Most Inno­v­a­tive Med­ical Device Com­pa­ny” at Glob­al Health and Phar­ma Awards (Sleep Review):

Advanced Brain Mon­i­tor­ing Inc was named the “Most Inno­v­a­tive Med­ical Device Com­pa­ny” by Glob­al Health and Phar­ma at its 2016 Health­care and Phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal awards. “This award rec­og­nizes our company’s suc­cess­es in devel­op­ing tech­nolo­gies which enable clin­i­cians and clin­i­cal tri­al spon­sors to pro­file brain health through the analy­sis of the brain’s elec­tri­cal activ­i­ty (EEG) dur­ing sleep and wake,” says Chris Berka, Advanced Brain Mon­i­tor­ing CEO…The com­pa­ny was recent­ly award­ed a $1.5 mm grant from Nation­al Insti­tute of Health to expand its data­base of awake and sleep EEG in patients with neu­rode­gen­er­a­tive dis­eases. “The envi­sioned future is for rou­tine brain health assess­ments dur­ing sleep and wak­ing to be con­duct­ed in a man­ner sim­i­lar to a mam­mo­gram or colonoscopy,” says Berka. “Ulti­mate­ly, ear­ly detec­tion will increase the like­li­hood that an inter­ven­tion can be matched to the patient based on the pres­ence of brain bio­mark­ers and admin­is­tered pri­or to the onset of cog­ni­tive decline.”

To learn more:

Lessons learned in bringing innovative brain fitness solutions to market

Suc­cess­ful inno­va­tors dis­sected key mar­ket & tech­nol­ogy trends and mod­els to val­i­date and com­mer­cial­ize inno­va­tion, with a par­tic­u­lar empha­sis on how to cre­ate a loy­al user base and gain main­stream dis­tri­b­u­tion via a diver­sity of chan­nels. Read the rest of this entry »

Needed: funding for innovative research on slowing cognitive decline via cognitive training

I was real­ly inter­est­ed in the recent cri­tique of the BBC brain train­ing exper­i­ment by Dr. Eliz­a­beth Zelin­s­ki. I think Owens et al (2010) was a crit­i­cal piece of research which was not con­duct­ed in the right way and was focus­ing on the wrong sam­ple pop­u­la­tion.  I total­ly agree with the com­ments by Dr. Zelin­s­ki regard­ing the poten­tial for sam­ple bias and the use of some ques­tion­able cog­ni­tive mea­sures. How­ev­er, I would like to take this cri­tique fur­ther and ques­tion whether the study was val­ue for mon­ey when there are oth­er stud­ies which can­not achieve fund­ing but would, in my opin­ion, show the criticism/scepticism of the use-it-or-lose-it the­o­ry.

I think there is not enough crit­i­cism about the age of the sam­ple pop­u­la­tion used in Owens et al. (2010). We have con­clu­sive cog­ni­tive and neu­ro­log­i­cal evi­dence that cognitive/neurological plas­tic­i­ty exists in young adults. There is also ade­quate evi­dence that neu­ro­plas­tic­i­ty is evi­dent in old­er adults. The crit­i­cal point which I want to make about the sam­ple pop­u­la­tion in Owens et al. study is that it did not tar­get the cor­rect sam­ple pop­u­la­tion, that is, old­er adults who are at risk of cognitive/neuronal atro­phy. It does not mat­ter if younger adults improve on brain train­ing tasks, or if skills picked up by younger adults from brain train­ing are not trans­ferred to oth­er cog­ni­tive domains, sim­ply because younger adults are good at these skills/cognitive func­tions. There­fore there is a pos­si­bil­i­ty that ceil­ing or scal­ing effects mask the true find­ings in Owens et al. (2010), as indi­cat­ed by Zelin­s­ki.

The recruit­ment of the sam­ple pop­u­la­tion is also very con­cern­ing and I do not feel that their con­trol group was appro­pri­ate. Read the rest of this entry »

About SharpBrains

As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, CNN, Reuters and more, SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking health and performance applications of brain science.

Follow us and Engage via…

twitter_logo_header
RSS Feed

Search for anything brain-related in our article archives

Enter Your Email to receive Sharp­Brains free, monthly eNewslet­ter:

Join more than 50,000 Sub­scribers and stay informed and engaged.