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Survey: Parents view Exercise as more effective than Prescription Medications to treat children with ADHD

Consider how research support for ADHD treatments are typically established. The ‘gold-standard’ approach would be a randomized-controlled trial in which children with ADHD are randomly assigned to the treatment or control group. The treatment, whatever it happens to be, would be carefully implemented in a research-based protocol. If possible Read the rest of this entry »

Are you familiar with these research findings and technologies revolutionizing Brain & Mental Health?

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Try adding 3 and 8 in your head.

That was easy. Now, trying adding 33 and 88. That was probably more difficult. Finally, try adding 333 and 888.

Time for SharpBrains’ October e-newsletter, this time discussing a range of research findings and technologies revolutionizing brain and mental health.

New thinking about cognition, brain and mind:

Emerging toolkit for brain health & enhancement:

News about the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (December 5-7th):

And finally, a couple of fun brain teasers to start the week of the right foot:

 

Have a great month of November!

The SharpBrains Team

Study suggests the real deficit underlying Attention Deficit Disorders is not Attention, but Working Memory

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Many parents have observed that their child with ADHD stays attentive and engaged during ‘high interest’ activities, e.g., while playing video games, but has considerable problems staying focused on less inherently engaging tasks, e.g., doing schoolwork. This discrepancy in attention during preferred and non-preferred activities has led some to Read the rest of this entry »

Studies reinforce the critical importance of ADHD treatment monitoring

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As the new school year approaches, let me highlight the essential value of ADHD treatment monitoring. Even when a child’s treatment has been going well, response to treatment can change over time. This is true for medication treatment, or any other treatment a child is receiving. By regularly monitoring how a child is doing at school, parents and professionals are alerted Read the rest of this entry »

5 Must-Read Articles, and an Online Course, to Help Children with ADHD

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— Dr. David Rabiner, Research Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke Uni­ver­sity and founder of the Atten­tion Research Update.

Given the ongoing changes and controversies surrounding ADHD diagnosis and treatment, let us highlight 5 key articles written by Duke University’s Dr. David Rabiner to summarize recent scientific findings and their implications, plus a very relevant online course to help parents and professionals help children with ADHD.

1. Study finds large gaps between research and practice in ADHD diagnosis and treatment

  • Key insight: Evidence-based guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics on the evaluation and treatment of ADHD are frequently not followed. Many children are diagnosed with ADHD in the absence of clearly meeting DSM diagnostic criteria, and behavioral treatment is rarely recommended.
  • Key data point: Pediatricians prescribed ADHD medication to roughly 93% of youth diagnosed with ADHD. Documentation that behavioral treatment was recommended, however, was present in only 13% of the charts.

Read the rest of this entry »

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