Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News


Busy schedules linked to better memory and cognition among middle-aged and older adults



Being Super Busy May* Be Good For Your Brain (Smithsonian Magazine):

“There hasn’t been much scientific research on busyness itself, although it’s something that we talk about so often,” explains Sara Festini, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas Center for Vital Longevity, a co-author of the new research published this week Read the rest of this entry »

New Nevada regulation requires professional fighters to undergo regular computerized cognitive testing

brain_craniumNevada officials to require brain health testing for fighters (Las Vegas Review-Journal):

“The Nevada Athletic Commission will require all licensed fighters in the Silver State, including professional boxers and mixed martial athletes, to undergo regular brain health testing, officials announced Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Read the rest of this entry »

Quick, interactive brain teaser to test your concentration and cognitive flexibility

Here is a fun and interactive version of the famous Stroop test, often used in neu­ropsy­cho­log­i­cal eval­u­a­tions to mea­sure response inhibition and cognitive flex­i­bil­ity. Performing well on the test requires strong concentration and self-regulation. Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Hearing aids, by reducing cognitive load, can improve brain function in persons with hearing loss


UTEP professor shows that hearing aids improve memory, speech (press release):

“A recent study by Jamie Desjardins, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the speech-language pathology program at The University of Texas at El Paso, found that hearing aids improve brain function in persons with hearing loss. Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Cognitive deficits continue long term in cancer survivors in domains important for social and executive functioning

elderly_senior_memory_loss_confusionCognitive Deficits Continue Long Term in Cancer Survivors (Medscape):

“Although cancer patients frequently experience short-term cognitive deficits, little is known about how long these deficits last or whether they worsen over time. Now, data from a large national sample suggest that cognitive deficits may persist long term. Read the rest of this entry »

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