Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

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Limitless evidenceless trend: The growth of nootropic supplements

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The all-too-under­stand­able urge to buy a bet­ter brain (Vox):

… unfor­tu­nate­ly, Bradley Coop­er is part­ly to blame for the boom of the edi­ble brain-improve­ment indus­try.

In 2011, he starred in Lim­it­less, a movie about a man who takes a spe­cial pill and becomes smarter and more capa­ble than any­one else on Earth. I’m jok­ing about the cul­tur­al sig­nif­i­cance of this movie, but I’m also not. It was a wild card and an unex­pect­ed hit, and it main­streamed an idea that had already been tak­ing hold among Sil­i­con Val­ley bio­hack­ers and human opti­miza­tion zealots. Read the rest of this entry »

Update: Common anticholinergic meds seen to increase dementia risk

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Dear read­er,

It’s time for Sharp­Brains e-newslet­ter dis­cussing the lat­est research and inno­va­tions to help pro­mote brain health, open­ing in this occa­sion with a large and wor­ry­ing study track­ing the long-term neur­al impact of com­mon­ly pre­scribed med­ica­tions.

New brain research:

New brain technology:

New brain thinking:

 

Last but not least, here is a fun brain teas­er for the week­end.  What do you see?

 

Have a great month of July,

 

The Sharp­Brains Team

Next: Monitoring the body’s electrical signalling to enhance brain health

Researchers are seek­ing to record and inter­pret the body’s elec­tri­cal sig­nals. Pic­ture: ZEISS Microscopy/Flickr

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READING THE BODY’S ELECTRICAL SIGNALS TO TREAT ILLNESS (Uni­ver­si­ty of Mel­bourne):

Chem­i­cal elec­tric­i­ty is how we move, think, and remem­ber.

And increas­ing­ly, as tech­nol­o­gy minia­turis­es and com­put­er pow­er mul­ti­plies, it’s how we are treat­ing chron­ic ill­ness.

Since the ful­ly implantable pace­mak­er was devel­oped in the 1950s to keep a patient’s heart beat­ing in rhythm using elec­tri­cal impuls­es, engi­neers have now gone on to devel­op devices that can be implant­ed direct­ly in the brain, under the scalp, or even inside blood ves­sels to treat dis­eases and dis­or­ders like Parkinson’s and epilep­sy, as well as men­tal ill­ness­es and paral­y­sis.

But Pro­fes­sor David Gray­den in the Uni­ver­si­ty of Melbourne’s Depart­ment of Bio­med­ical Engi­neer­ing is aim­ing to go fur­ther Read the rest of this entry »

Trend: Going on a brain health vacation

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A Look at Lux­u­ry Resorts That Now Offer Brain Health Pro­grams (Next Avenue):

Like any self-dis­re­spect­ing woman, I’ve spent a life­time of mir­ror scruti­ny (and cash) on my thighs, hips, heart, back, post-baby bel­ly, even my eye­brows. For all this invest­ment, I’ve paid scant atten­tion to the one irre­place­able body part that keeps every­thing else run­ning: my brain.

Why not learn how to show it some love, then, in the nicest pos­si­ble way — by tak­ing it on a brain vaca­tion?

Gray mat­ter is the lat­est twist in the red-hot well­ness tourism cat­e­go­ry, which is grow­ing by 7.5% a year, accord­ing to the Glob­al Well­ness Insti­tute .… “It’s pos­si­ble to alter 70% of your genet­ic des­tiny by chang­ing non­genet­ic fac­tors, with the deci­sions you make. That’s the new field called epi­ge­net­ics,” says Dr. Richard Car­mona, the 17th U.S. Sur­geon Gen­er­al…

Although any­one can learn brain-health basics at home, doing so with pro­fes­sion­al sup­port while on vaca­tion costs, well, big vaca­tion bucks. 10-room Life­works runs $5,000 for four nights of all-inclu­sive meals and activ­i­ties. Canyon Ranch’s “Boost Your Brain” pro­gram costs $500, and that’s above its stan­dard tab of $1,099 per per­son per night — also all-inclu­sive.

Maybe it’s best to think of this as a brain invest­ment as well as a hol­i­day. What’s the price of a brain that works bet­ter, longer?”

Trend in Context:

Next week is Brain Awareness Week!

We’re get­ting ready to cel­e­brate our amaz­ing human brains and minds next week. Please join us and many oth­ers around the globe!

Every March, Brain Aware­ness Week (BAW) unites the efforts of part­ner orga­ni­za­tions world­wide in a cel­e­bra­tion of the brain for peo­ple of all ages. Activ­i­ties are lim­it­ed only by the orga­niz­ers’ imag­i­na­tions and include open days at neu­ro­science labs; exhi­bi­tions about the brain; lec­tures on brain-relat­ed top­ics; social media cam­paigns; dis­plays at libraries and com­mu­ni­ty cen­ters; class­room work­shops; and more.

When: March 11–17th, 2019

Learn more HERE about the many resources and activ­i­ties avail­able. And here you have some arti­cles we believe you’ll enjoy read­ing and shar­ing:  

 

Watch All Recordings Now (40+ Speakers, 12+ Hours)

About SharpBrains

As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, CNN, Reuters and more, SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking health and performance applications of brain science.

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