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Tailoring computing experience based on user’s mental state and quality of attention: Key neurotechnology patent #30

Automated selection

– Illus­tra­tive image from U.S. Patent No. 7,395,507

Today we high­light a fas­ci­nat­ing 2008 patent assigned to Microsoft, dis­cussing assess­ment tech­niques such as pupil track­ing or head ori­en­ta­tion sen­sors to iden­ti­fy where and what the user is focused on–and what types of  infor­ma­tion and/ or noti­fi­ca­tions to dis­play accord­ing­ly.

U.S. Patent No. 7,395,507: Auto­mat­ed selec­tion of appro­pri­ate infor­ma­tion based on a com­put­er user’s con­text.

  • Assignee(s): Microsoft Cor­po­ra­tion
  • Inventor(s): James O. Robarts, Dan Newell, Ken­neth H. Abbott
  • Tech­nol­o­gy Cat­e­go­ry: Neu­ro-mon­i­tor­ing
  • Issue Date: July 1, 2008

SharpBrains’ Take:

The ‘507 patent dis­clos­es meth­ods for assess­ing a user’s men­tal state and more broad­ly the user’s con­text, to dis­cern whether or not to present the users with a mes­sage (e.g., an adver­tise­ment). Read the rest of this entry »

Study debunks the “earlier is always better” myth about brain development and cognitive training

teenagers_collegeGood News: You’ve Got a Bet­ter Brain Than You Think (Time):

Get­ting old­er? No worries…When does our learn­ing poten­tial start to go soft? A new paper pub­lished in Psy­cho­log­i­cal Sci­ence sug­gests that it might be lat­er than we thought. Read the rest of this entry »

Adding mindfulness to the PTSD therapist’s toolkit

mindfulness_ptsd—–

Sol­diers who return home in casts and cas­kets are not the only ones struck down by the trau­ma of war. Many young mil­i­tary men and women car­ry emo­tion­al wounds far beyond the bat­tle­field in the form of post-trau­mat­ic stress dis­or­der (PTSD). This Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Training law-enforcement “itchy brains” can reduce shooting-related civilian casualties

cognitivetraining_reduceshootingcasualties

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Brain Train­ing May Help Avoid Civil­ian Casu­al­ties (Duke Today):

Although fir­ing a gun seems like one action, it is made up of many small­er deci­sions and move­ments that require coor­di­na­tion between mul­ti­ple brain areas.

The sud­den deci­sion to not shoot, called ‘response inhi­bi­tion,’ is crit­i­cal when some­one inno­cent comes into the line of fire. Read the rest of this entry »

Mixed reaction to new BRAIN initiative

BRAINinitiativeMap­ping the mind—smart think­ing for brain health? (The Lancet):  “…Will the real­i­ty match the ambi­tion? Reac­tion has been mixed…Given that our brains change, learn, think, remem­ber, and are shaped by our expe­ri­ences, inter­ac­tions with oth­er peo­ple, and soci­ety, map­ping the elec­tri­cal spikes in the brain seems an over­ly restric­tive bio­med­ical approach to under­stand­ing the most com­plex organ in the human body. It is also doubt­ful that this approach will yield cures for con­di­tions such as Parkinson’s dis­ease and Alzheimer’s dis­ease as purported…There are also non-bio­med­ical aspects of brain dis­or­ders that require urgent atten­tion. For exam­ple, access to psy­cho­log­i­cal treat­ments for depres­sion world­wide is woe­ful­ly inad­e­quate…”

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