Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

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With two new funding mechanisms, The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative reaches out of neuroscience to expand its Neurodegeneration Challenge Network

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RFA Now Open: CZI Neu­rode­gen­er­a­tion Chal­lenge Net­work (Chan Zucker­berg Ini­tia­tive release):

The Chan Zucker­berg Ini­tia­tive invites appli­ca­tions to join the CZI Neu­rode­gen­er­a­tion Chal­lenge Net­work, an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary col­lab­o­ra­tive ini­tia­tive to increase under­stand­ing of the fun­da­men­tal biol­o­gy of neu­rode­gen­er­a­tive dis­or­ders. Appli­ca­tions are being accept­ed for two fund­ing mech­a­nisms: Read the rest of this entry »

Regulating and helping shape the evolving phenomenon of Direct-to-Consumer Neuroscience

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We’re proud to share that our CEO and Edi­tor-in-Chief Alvaro Fer­nan­dez is par­tic­i­pat­ing in a fas­ci­nat­ing and time­ly 2‑day meet­ing, host­ed by The Ban­bury Cen­ter at Cold Spring Har­bor Lab­o­ra­to­ry under the theme The evolv­ing phe­nom­e­non of Direct-to-Con­sumer Neu­ro­science, to help iden­ti­fy and address key open regulatory/ eth­i­cal issues relat­ed to the growth of per­va­sive neu­rotech­nolo­gies and dig­i­tal brain health plat­forms offered/ sold direct­ly to con­sumers.

The event is off-the-record so we won’t be able to blog about it, but here are some resources if inter­est­ed in learn­ing more about the gen­er­al con­text for the event: Read the rest of this entry »

Researchers stress need for neurotechnologies to protect the mental dimension of individuals and groups, especially mental privacy and integrity

Image: Ars Elec­tron­i­ca | CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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From Health­care to War­fare: How to Reg­u­late Brain Tech­nol­o­gy (Uni­ver­si­ty of Basel press release):

The term “dual-use” refers to tech­nol­o­gy that can be used for both ben­e­fi­cial (i.e., med­ical) and harm­ful (i.e., mil­i­tary of ter­ror­is­tic) aims. Until recent­ly, most dual-use tech­nol­o­gy emerged espe­cial­ly in virol­o­gy and bac­te­ri­ol­o­gy. In the last years, how­ev­er, mil­i­tary-fund­ed research has entered the domain of neu­ro­science and neu­rotech­nol­o­gy.

This has result­ed in a rapid growth in brain tech­nol­o­gy pro­to­types aimed at Read the rest of this entry »

Eight Tips To Understand and Remember What You Read — Especially As You Read Nonfiction

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Despite Insta­gram, YouTube, Face­book, Twit­ter, and tele­vi­sion, (or per­haps pre­cise­ly because of all of them) tra­di­tion­al read­ing is still an impor­tant skill. Whether it is mag­a­zines, pro­fes­sion­al man­u­als or fas­ci­nat­ing books, peo­ple still need to read, now and in years ahead. And much of it is non­fic­tion mate­r­i­al, where it’s impor­tant to real­ly under­stand and then remem­ber what you are read­ing.

An unfor­tu­nate rea­son why many peo­ple don’t read much these days is that they don’t read well. Read­ing, for them, is slow, hard work and they don’t remem­ber as much as they should. They often have to read some­thing sev­er­al times before they under­stand and remem­ber what they read.

Why? You would think that every­one learns how to read well at school. Schools do try, but I work with mid­dle-school teach­ers and they tell me that many stu­dents are 2–3 years behind grade lev­el in read­ing pro­fi­cien­cy. Some of the blame can be placed on fads for teach­ing read­ing, such as phon­ics and “whole lan­guage,” which some­times are pro­mot­ed in shal­low ways that don’t respect the need for both approach­es. And much of the blame can be laid at the feet of par­ents who set poor exam­ples and, of course, on the young­sters who are too dis­tract­ed by social media and tele­vi­sion to learn how to read well.

Now the good news. For any­one who missed out on good read­ing skills, it is not too late to improve now. I sum­ma­rize below what I think it takes to read with good speed and com­pre­hen­sion. Read the rest of this entry »

The State of Mindfulness Science: 10 Key Research Findings to Encourage and Guide your Meditation Practice in 2018

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Dur­ing the past two decades, more and more sci­en­tists have stud­ied mindfulness—a Bud­dhist-inspired col­lec­tion of prac­tices aimed at help­ing us to cul­ti­vate moment-to-moment aware­ness of our­selves and our envi­ron­ment. Their ear­ly find­ings trig­gered an enor­mous amount of enthu­si­asm for med­i­ta­tion.

Some­times, how­ev­er, jour­nal­ists and even sci­en­tists (who should know bet­ter) have over­stat­ed the phys­i­cal and men­tal health ben­e­fits, which has fed grow­ing skep­ti­cism about mind­ful­ness. Read the rest of this entry »

About SharpBrains

As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, CNN, Reuters,  SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking how brain science can improve our health and our lives.

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