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Test your Short-Term Memory: How many letters can you memorize?

Mem­o­ry is more com­plex that we usu­al­ly think. Cog­ni­tive sci­ences have iden­ti­fied dif­fer­ent mem­o­ry sys­tems, each sup­port­ed by dif­fer­ent brain regions. One major dif­fer­ence is between long-term and short-term mem­o­ry (also called work­ing mem­o­ry).

Long-term mem­o­ry is an unlim­it­ed stor­age of mem­o­ries dat­ing as far back as you can remem­ber to a few min­utes ago. For instance, when you remem­ber your first day in high-school or what you said to your col­league two min­utes ago, you are using your long-term mem­o­ry sys­tem. This sys­tem depends most­ly on parts of the tem­po­ral (in blue here) and frontal (in green) regions of the brain.

Short-term or work­ing mem­o­ry is a lim­it­ed stor­age used to briefly keep the infor­ma­tion need­ed for the task at hand. For instance, when you keep in mind a phone num­ber while you are dial­ing it or when you do some men­tal cal­cu­la­tion you are using your work­ing mem­o­ry sys­tem. This sys­tem depends most­ly on parts of the frontal (in green) and pari­etal (in yel­low) regions of the brain.

Work­ing mem­o­ry is cru­cial for most of the tasks we per­form dai­ly. It is also quite vul­ner­a­ble to the aging process. Two good rea­sons to try to main­tain this func­tion! Ready to test and sharp­en your short-term mem­o­ry?

Fol­low this link to mem­o­rize series of let­ters. The first 2 tri­als are very easy but the test gets quite chal­leng­ing after that!

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Categories: Brain Teasers, Cognitive Neuroscience

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