Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

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Brain teasers and tips to stay sharp in between jobs (and when you have one too)

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7 WAYS TO STAY PRODUCTIVE WHEN YOU’RE IN BETWEEN JOBS (Fast Company):

Sure, you didn’t plan on being on per­ma­nent vaca­tion, a.k.a. unem­ployed, but here you are. And believe it or not, this can be a bless­ing in disguise…

3. VOLUNTEER AT AN UPCOMING INDUSTRY CONFERENCE.
Research any asso­ci­a­tions in your indus­try that might have an upcom­ing lun­cheon, con­fer­ence, or net­work­ing event. Reach out to the coor­di­na­tors to see if you could use your exper­tise at their next event…

5. STAY SHARP.
Exer­cise your mind with Read the rest of this entry »

For college students, mental health screening kiosks offer ‘Check-Up from the Neck Up’

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A ‘Check-Up from the Neck Up’ — Men­tal Health Screen­ing Kiosks at Drexel (Drexel Now):

Dur­ing their time in col­lege, most stu­dents learn the impor­tance of look­ing out for their own health.

How­ever, some miss the con­nec­tion that their men­tal well-being is just as impor­tant as keep­ing a reg­u­lar exer­cise reg­i­men or eat­ing the right diet Read the rest of this entry »

(Some) New Yorker articles are bogus

Scarecrow-or-strawmanI love read­ing the New Yorker. I have writ­ten before about bogus brain games, and about bogus brain train­ing claims. We have pub­lished a 10-question check­list to help con­sumers make informed decisions.

All this is to say I was sur­prised to read a recent New Yorker blog arti­cle titled “Brain games are bogus.” If you are going to make such strong claims, you need to back them up with seri­ous due dili­gence and analy­sis, and explain to read­ers what Read the rest of this entry »

Maximizing brain fitness and mental well-being improves both public health and individual quality of life

 We’re hav­ing a good con­ver­sa­tion among Sharp­Brains Sum­mit par­tic­i­pants, prompted by the blog post Life­long brain well­ness and performance–not med­ical disease–drives grow­ing demand for dig­i­tal brain health solu­tions. In what is a beau­ti­ful exam­ple of the need to see both the for­est and the trees Read the rest of this entry »

The Business and Ethics of the Brain Fitness Boom — Part 4: The Future

Build­ing Blocks for a Bet­ter Future

The best alter­na­tive for tomor­row should be bet­ter than the best alter­na­tive avail­able today. How do we get there, when “cog­ni­tion” and “brain fit­ness” remain elu­sive con­cepts in pop­u­lar cul­ture? I believe that the lack of pub­lic edu­ca­tion is the major obsta­cle that lim­its the brain fit­ness field’s poten­tial to deliver real-world ben­e­fits, since only informed demand will ensure the ongo­ing devel­op­ment of ratio­nal, struc­tured “rules of the road.” What could be done to address this and other par­tic­u­lar obsta­cles? Read the rest of this entry »

The Business and Ethics of the Brain Fitness Boom — Part 3: The Real Need

Engag­ing peo­ple where they are in the life-course

Eighty per­cent of the 38,000 adults over age 50 who were respon­ders in the 2010 AARP Mem­ber Opin­ion Sur­vey indi­cated “stay­ing men­tally sharp” was their top ranked inter­est and con­cern (Dinger, 2010). What exactly does this phrase mean? And what role can tech­nol­ogy play in “stay­ing men­tally sharp”? Intel CEO Paul Otellini has said, “You have to start by think­ing about what peo­ple want to do… and work back­ward.” Read the rest of this entry »

The Business and Ethics of the Brain Fitness Boom — Part 2: The Ethics

The ter­mi­nol­ogy “fun­da­men­tal attri­bu­tion error” describes the ten­dency to over­value personality-based expla­na­tions for observed human behav­iors, while under­valu­ing sit­u­a­tional expla­na­tions for those behav­iors.  I believe that a pri­mary rea­son behind many per­ceived and real eth­i­cal chal­lenges in the brain fit­ness field is due not so much to cer­tain stake­hold­ers’ lack of per­sonal or pro­fes­sional ethics, but derives from the flawed soci­etal con­struct that under­pins cur­rent, rel­e­vant inno­va­tions. To improve the ethics of the brain fit­ness busi­ness and its appli­ca­tion (and empower con­sumers’ informed deci­sion mak­ing), there must first be agree­ment about a mean­ing­ful, appro­pri­ate way to ana­lyze and guide inno­va­tion. This is the crux of the prob­lem. The cur­rent med­ical model is not up to the task at hand, since it is heav­ily skewed toward inva­sive drugs and devices dri­ven by disease-based mod­els, and fails to lever­age Read the rest of this entry »

New market report on Pervasive Neurotechnology & Intellectual Property

Haven’t you read this book yet?

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