Sharp Brains: Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News

Neuroplasticity, Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health News


10 Brain Transformers: A Poem


As we enter an era of a trans­form­ing cerebrals

there will soon be “Mind­ful” wearables

to con­cen­trate, med­i­tate and self regulate

Did I just see you drop your jaw­bone at the gate?

Charge your­self to a calm­ing or ener­giz­ing state

Enhance mem­ory and you are now feel­ing great

Your life may soon be in a dif­fer­ent motion

With Elec­tri­cal and mag­netic brain stimulation

Not just in games or Read the rest of this entry »

Pros and Cons of latest wearable tech trend: Mood-altering electrical brain stimulation

brain-stimulationElec­tri­cal brain stim­u­la­tion moves from lab to home, experts wary (CBC radio):

Zap­ping your brain to adjust your mood may sound like the stuff of sci­ence fic­tion, or a campy B movie.

But Anna Wexler is a real life grad stu­dent at the Mass­a­chus­sets Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy, demon­strat­ing a real, com­mer­cially avail­able device she bought for less than $300 Read the rest of this entry »

Non-invasive brain stimulation in children creates opportunities and risks

TMSvtDCSBrain Stim­u­la­tion in Chil­dren Spurs Hope—and Con­cern (Sci­en­tific American):

The idea of using mag­nets or elec­tric cur­rents to treat psy­chi­atric or learn­ing dis­or­ders — or just to enhance cog­ni­tion — has gen­er­ated a flurry of excite­ment over the past ten years. The tech­nique is thought to work by acti­vat­ing neural cir­cuits or by mak­ing it eas­ier for neu­rons to fire. The research is still in its infancy, but at least 10,000 adults have under­gone Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Neonatal MRI scans of preterm children can help predict cognitive and academic problems, and guide early interventions

Localized brain regions associated with early mathematics

Pre­dict­ing future cog­ni­tion in preterm chil­dren with MRI (Oxford Uni­ver­sity Press blog):

In the wake of the devel­op­ment of advanced neona­tal inten­sive med­ical care, more and more chil­dren born preterm man­age to beat the pre­vi­ously tough odds…While this is one of the suc­cess sto­ries of mod­ern med­i­cine, long-term follow-up of premature-born pedi­atric cohorts show that…Many chil­dren will expe­ri­ence cog­ni­tive prob­lems that will Read the rest of this entry »

Would Warren Buffett be a highly viable Presidential candidate?


My col­league Dr. Murali Doraiswamy just wrote an excel­lent opin­ion piece for The New York Times: With Age Comes Wis­dom, and Some Con­cerns For Can­di­dates.

He ends it up say­ing that, “As Henry Ford noted, “Any­one who stops learn­ing is old, whether at 20 or 80. Any­one who keeps learn­ing stays young.” We should shift the debate away from wor­ry­ing about the age of our can­di­dates and focus instead on their cog­ni­tive skill set and prac­ti­cal wisdom.”

I couldn’t agree more with those wise words.

warren-buffetBut, I do dis­agree with the words just pre­ced­ing them: “War­ren Buf­fett, at the age of 85, would still be a highly viable can­di­date, should he choose to run.”

To see why I disagree–and why it matters–let me syn­the­size some recent research on brain health, cog­ni­tion and aging. Read the rest of this entry »

Growing evidence that brain health requires personalized, multi-pronged interventions



The Right Dose of Exer­cise for the Aging Brain (New York Times):

A small amount of exer­cise may improve our abil­ity to think as we age, but more may not be bet­ter, accord­ing to a new study of exer­cise and cognition…

In gen­eral, the researchers found, most of the exer­cis­ers showed improve­ment in their think­ing skills…but these gains were about the same whether peo­ple had exer­cised for 75 min­utes a week or 225 min­utes Read the rest of this entry »

Study: Training law-enforcement “itchy brains” can reduce shooting-related civilian casualties



Brain Train­ing May Help Avoid Civil­ian Casu­al­ties (Duke Today):

Although fir­ing a gun seems like one action, it is made up of many smaller deci­sions and move­ments that require coor­di­na­tion between mul­ti­ple brain areas.

The sud­den deci­sion to not shoot, called ‘response inhi­bi­tion,’ is crit­i­cal when some­one inno­cent comes into the line of fire. Read the rest of this entry »

Welcome to

As seen in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, CNN,, and more, SharpBrains is an independent market research firm tracking health and wellness applications of brain science. Explore our most popular resources HERE.

Haven’t you read this book yet?

Follow Us…


Newsletter Signup

Enter Your Email to receive Sharp­Brains free, monthly eNewslet­ter:
Join more than 50,000 Sub­scribers and stay informed and engaged.

Subscribe RSS Feed

Subscribe to the RSS Feed